Motorcycle Licenses and Permits in Virginia

Riders in Virginia need to have an M, M2 or M3 endorsement on their driver’s license. In Virginia those endorsements will be listed under “Class” on the front of the driver’s license. The number after the M specifically denotes the types of motorcycle the license holder is permitted to ride. M2 technically means the rider can only legally operate two-wheeled motorcycles and M3 denotes the rider can legally operate three-wheeled motorcycles. Anyone with just the M on their license is authorized to ride both two-wheeled and three-wheeled motorcycles.

Anyone who wants a motorcycle endorsement on their Virginia license needs to:

  • Pass a vision test
  • Pass a motorcycle knowledge exam
  • Hold a motorcycle learners permit for at least 30 days (or 9 months if you are under the age of 18)
  • Pass the motorcycle road skills test administered at a participating DMV customer service center in Virginia

Anyone who takes the Virginia Rider Training Program doesn’t have to pass either the written motorcycle knowledge exam or the motorcycle road skills test. The motorcycle endorsement does need to be renewed, so when you renew your Virginia driver’s license make sure to renew your motorcycle endorsement as well.

Motorcycle Licenses and Permits in South Carolina

South Carolina riders must obtain a “Class M” driver’s license to legally operate a motorcycle in the state. The South Carolina DMV encourages prospective riders to read the Motorcycle and Moped Operator’s Manual before getting on a motorcycle. Anyone who is eligible to drive in South Carolina can get a motorcycle beginner’s permit, but they can only renew their beginner’s permit after attempting the state’s motorcycle road test.

If a permit holder fails the motorcycle road test three times they must complete and pass a South Carolina DMV-approved motorcycle safety course to receive their motorcycle license. You can get your motorcycle license in the state without taking the safety course if you pass the motorcycle road test.

You can find out which South Carolina DMV locations offer the Motorcycle Road Test and schedule your test by visiting the Motorcycle Road Test website.

Motorcycle Licenses and Permits in North Carolina

Anyone in North Carolina with a regular license, full level 3 provisional license or commercial driver license is eligible to get their motorcycle learner’s permit or a motorcycle endorsement. Drivers between the ages of 16 and 18 must have at least the full provisional license and drivers over the age of 18 must have at least a regular license to get a motorcycle learner permit.

In North Carolina, motorcycle endorsements are good for eight years if you’re between the age of 18 and 66, but they are only good for five years if you’re over the age of 66.

Every rider seeking a motorcycle endorsement must pass a:

  • Vision test
  • Traffic signs test
  • Motorcycle knowledge test
  • Motorcycle skills test (road test)

The skills tests are only available at certain North Carolina DMV locations at certain times. You can schedule by visiting their Motorcycle & Moped Privileges page and using their online appointment scheduler.

Motorcycle Licenses and Permits in West Virginia

Like Virginia, West Virginia riders who want to be exempted from the riding skills test can enroll in and pass the West Virginia Motorcycle Safety Program. In order to enroll in the course riders must first get their temporary motorcycle instruction permit. You must also be at least 16 years of age and have a valid West Virginia driver’s license.

You don’t have to take the Motorcycle Safety Program course if you pass the West Virginia DMV’s 25-question motorcycle knowledge test. Once you pass the test, you’ll get a one-time 90-day motorcycle learner’s permit. If your permit expires before you pass the rider course, you’ll need to retake the test.

The roughly 17-hour rider course is scheduled on weekends (starts on Saturday and ends on Sunday). You can find out about scheduling availability and enroll by calling (866) 355-9399. Be warned, riders taking the class must bring a DOT or Snell-approved helmet with them to the course, as well as:

  • Eye protection
  • Over the ankle boots
  • Long sleeve shirt or jacket
  • Gloves

Riders who pass the course will get the “F” endorsement on their driver’s license. Riders who take the skill test on a three-wheel motorcycle are technically only legally eligible to ride three-wheel motorcycles, but riders who pass the test on a two-wheel motorcycle can ride both two- and three-wheel motorcycles.

Motorcycle Licenses and Permits in Georgia

The process for getting a motorcycle license in Georgia is pretty straightforward for adults. You’ll need to pass a vision test as well as the Department of Driving Services’ test. Riders will also need to successfully pass the motorcycle skills test. These road tests are available by appointment only and can only be scheduled at certain times of day and at certain DDS locations. Only people with a valid Georgia Motorcycle permit can schedule an appointment.

Getting licensed in Georgia is a bit more inconvenient for minors thanks to “Joshua’s Law”, a law that requires 16- and 17-year-olds to jump through some extra hoops to get their Class D license (motorcycle permit). There are three different driver education options in the state, all of which are time consuming for both the learner and their parents. Approved methods are available through many high schools and private driving schools in the state of Georgia.

Minors will also need to provide a certificate of completion for Georgia’s Alcohol and Drug Awareness Program (ADAP/eADAP) and a Georgia DDS Behind-the-Wheel training program, as well as meet some other application requirements to get their motorcycle permit. You should visit the permit page if you or your son or daughter must deal with these extra hassles.

Get Help After a Motorcycle Accident in Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, West Virginia or Georgia

The Motorcycle Law Group can’t help you pass your motorcycle skills test, but we can fight for you if you’ve been injured in a motorcycle crash. Our attorneys understand riders and the often-obnoxious bureaucratic hoops they must contend with because our attorneys are riders.

Having a lawyer who can relate to what you’re going through and knowledgably speak to your accident and the challenges facing riders on the road might make all the difference in your case.

Call us at 1-855-LAW-RIDERS (855-529-7433) for a FREE motorcycle accident case evaluation.